infra kicks

After spending best part of the weekend finishing couple of games articles and the course materials I have been working on, I decided to reward myself somehow. In this weird nerdie way, it definitely had to be something media-tech related (but not too expensive, since most of my money is already going to all this stuff). So I bought a Logitech wireless keyboard & mouse combo (the MX version), and then amused myself by configuring the output of my media server to the big-screen television for the rest of the evening. Since this thing does not have proper inputs (and it is not the LCD/plasma one I will get next) the outcome is only half satisfying. But: I can now have web information services, a game, a TV channel and a Winamp running simultaneously on the same big screen. Ok, when I started Word to write this note, I had to close a couple of windows, but yet. It is curious to study oneself and see what are the sources of pleasure. I had a Star Wars Galaxies: An Empire Divided free 14-days download & account deal waiting there, too, but instead I ended up doing this. Perhaps this feels more like an “own” thing to do? Or then, perhaps I just get my kicks from working at the infrastructure level, rather than with the content. Hard to say.

version wars

Oh boy. Every time I nowadays start the MS Word, I am greeted by one explosion of a non-compatibility warnings, kindly suggesting I should immediately renounce any idea of working. Office 2003 and Adobe Acrobat 5 seem not to talk each other any more, and as our university will no longer provide us with Abobe licenses (I am told), I am put against the wall. Either Microsoft or Adobe: choose which camp you belong to.

I seem to have been overworking again. I should be able to read it from my calendar, of course, but sadly it needs to be my physics telling me that all meters have been on red for too long. Ok, I will try and stay in bed tomorrow as long as I can. There is just too much exciting stuff going on that I feel to be responsible, so it is hard to take any real breaks.

I hope we could play more Beyond Good and Evil. It seems to have the right balance and combination of different game elements (taking animal photographs is a nice touch), and the right, relatively smooth learning curve. But days are long, evenings needed for taking care of the emails piling up from the association, projects, students and other contacts (while working days are packed with meetings) and nights are too short. Ok, I will stop whining (at the front of computer!) and get into bed. See ya!

end of holidays?

For a peaceful summer, there has been quite a lot to do lately. Part relates to the asynchrony in this globalized world: when Finns should be having their holidays they cannot do so as everything has to be got ready before the holidays of August in many other countries. And now in August everything is starting up in the Finnish systems. I sometimes wonder where this will lead into, as international collaboration becomes more and more popular in various forms. The final outcome can be that there is no “holiday” as that kind of category (time and space outside of work) we used to know before. Or, will there be a backlash, eventually (everyone quits trying to get anything done during whole summer)? Oh yes, and there could be “standard holidays” set up for whole world. In the name of effectivity and multinational workforce.

I finally succeeded in getting firewalls, servers and client software into that kind of position I can remotely access and administer my web domain and other services from anywhere there is a net connection. Handy. It is also really great to be able to get all the digital images into easily browsable folders. You can take a look at some of the old stuff from my university home album page, here.

summer nights' action

Summer is perfect time to do whatever you want. At least in principle: I can just about still remember times when I spent long Northern summer nights reading or playing. Nowadays, other priorities take hold. Summer is perfect time to work; that is true for an academic. Winters are filled with dozens of projects, past, present, future: planning, reporting and administration work. And there is of course teaching and other things like DiGRA and other association work I am involved with. When summer comes, I am just desperate to do research: the work I actually want to do most of all. So, I just sit inside, read and write. Wonderful!

There has not been so much time for games of books. I did read some more from the Culture series by Banks. There was also some straightforward action, Top Spin (a tennis game) and PainKiller. Looking at the recent releases, I have not found so much originality, but then again – for a summer night of entertainment, even yet another tennis game, or first-person-shooter can do.

games as fiction and fantasy

After some days of driving around Finland during my summer holidays, we ended up into Finncon, the national science fiction and fantasy convention in Jyvaskyla. The event was its usual pleasant mixture of talks, presentations and good company (this time the invasion of teenage Anime fans in their cosplay outfits brought more colour to the geeky mix).

The foreign special quests were Robin Hobb, John Clute and Gwyneth Jones, whose readings I especially enjoyed. It is really pity that her work is so hard to find, at least in our country. We had interesting discussions both at the science fiction researchers’ meeting in Friday, as well as in the SF Research panel in Sunday. My personal highlight, however was the Games as Fiction and Fantasy session we had organised with Jussi Holopainen (Nokia/NRC), Mikael Kasurinen (Remedy) and Mike Pohjola (the author of Myrskyn aika RPG). The topic was impossibly complex, and time was ridiculously short, which made it all great fun. Audience was active in making questions, and I hope we created some conceptual clarity, even if much was of course left unanswered.

(The cat with a question.)

game studies, hybrid voices

Our Lab released the first course series to pilot game studies as online learning today. The phone has been ringing, and I have been busy (with my croaking voice, still in that summer flu) explaining various media people that yes, games are indeed researched, and that yes, there is need for education at this field, too. Later, while I was reading Jessica Mulligan’s Biting the Hand column series (1997-2003), I came across Raph Koster answering Jessica’s pro-entertainment piece with “The Case for Art“. There are other columns and discussions either openly or indirectly referring and linking in, and – rather than going to the debate itself – it got me thinking about the nature of column writing. This kind of blogs can be used, or perceived, as columns, too, but they can also be many other things. I enjoy reading several columns from traditional printed magazines, as well, but there is not similar kind of hypertextual openness in that medium. Some day, some way, I would like to be able to try and create a hybrid, a vehicle for truly polyphonic expression.

thousand sorts of fun?

Deeper existential concerns aside for a moment, one of the main wishes of many people is that they would enjoy their life. “Having fun” seems to one way to express this goal, but enjoyment comes in so many guises. Amoeba, kaleidoscope and chameleon are among my favorite metaphors these days, trying to get a grasp at this mutable and polyphonic nature of ours.

My capacity of having fun has been hampered somewhat by the summer flu that got hold of me last week. These things just seem to last, at least a week or more. Damn thing! I had hopes for the Midsummer Day. Now I just got an unannounced early installation of the new network connection, and an ADSL box which of course declined to serve these pages to the web any more. Some expensive calls and three feverish days of debugging later, I finally got the new flash bios update for the ADSL box, which managed not only to fix the NAT routing error, but also installed a new firewall service. Nice.

Am I enjoying all this tech, or not?

Hard question to answer, really. When you are walking the road, do you enjoy the sand and stone under your feet?