CFP: DiGRA/FDG 2016

Please spread the word:

CFP DiGRA/FDG 2016 – 1st Joint International Conference of DiGRA and FDG

For the first time, the Digital Games Research Association (DiGRA) and the Foundation of Digital Games (FDG) will partner in an unprecedented gathering of games researchers. We invite researchers and educators within game research, broadly construed, to submit their work.

For more information, please visit the conference’s website: www.digra-fdg2016.org

Tracks

DiGRA/FDG aims at being a venue for game research from all research disciplines. In line with this, it accepts and encourages submissions in the following six tracks, on a wide range of subjects including, but not limited to:

  • Game design: Design techniques, practices, methods, post mortems, etc.
  • Game criticism and analysis: Close readings, ontologies and frameworks, historical studies, philosophical explorations, and other humanities-informed approaches
  • Play studies + Interaction and player experience: studies of play, observations and interviews of players, and research based on other methods from the social sciences; game interfaces, player metrics, modeling player experience
  • Artificial intelligence: agents, motion/camera planning, navigation, adaptivity, procedural content generation, dialog, authoring tools, general game playing
  • Game technology: engines, frameworks, graphics, networking, animation
  • Game production: studies of game production processes, studio studies, software studies, platform studies and software engineering

Due to the interdisciplinary nature of the DiGRA/FDG conference, authors and reviewers alike will be required to describe their research background and field of study as part of the submission process. The intention for this is to help reviewers be conscious of when they are reviewing work outside their own field as well as making clear the proportions of contributing fields.

Submission categories

DiGRA/FDG 2016 supports two different categories for submitting research:

  • Full Papers (no more than 16 pages)
  • Extended Abstracts with a maximum length of 2-pages

This structure reflects the cross-disciplinary nature and different conference traditions of the conference attendants. A full paper submission is recommended for completed research work, in particular empirical or technical work. The extended abstract format is suitable for discussion topics and ideas. Both full papers and abstracts are subject to a double-blind review process. These two categories are the only ones that will be published in DiGRA’s digital library.

Deadlines full papers and extended abstracts

Submission deadline

  • January 29 2016 (hard deadline)

Acceptance/rejection notification

  • March 21 2016

Rebuttals

  • March 25 2016

Notification of final decisions

  • March 31 2016

Camera ready

  • April 29 2016

In addition to this, DiGRA/FDG 2016 accepts submissions for:

  • Events with a maximum length of 2-page abstract
  • Panels with a maximum length of 2-page abstract

These are curated by the local organizers and do not go through an anonymized process.

Deadlines panels and events

Submission deadline

  • January 29 2016 (hard deadline)

Acceptance/rejection notification

  • March 21 2016

Camera ready

  • April 29 2016

Some work does not fit as paper presentations due to its nature or research maturity. For this, DiGRA/FDG 2016 is open to submission to the following categories:

  • Posters with a maximum length of 2-page abstract
  • Demos with a maximum length of 2-page abstract

These categories have late deadlines to allow the most recent research and results to be submitted.

Deadlines posters and demos

Submission deadline

  • April 8 2016 (hard deadline)

Acceptance/rejection notification

  • May 9 2016

Camera ready

  • May 23 2016

DiGRA/FDG 2016 provides a doctoral consortium for PhD students. Those interested in attending this should submit a position paper in the extended abstract format with a maximum length of 2 pages.

Deadlines doctoral consortium

Submission deadline

  • April 22 2016 (hard deadline)

Acceptance/rejection notification

  • May 9 2016

DiGRA/FDG 2016 also welcomes submissions to arrange workshops. These have an earlier deadline than other submission to support workshops that wish to have their own peer reviewing process for submissions. These should be submitted as extended abstracts with a maximum length of 2 pages. Please submit workshop proposals by email to the three program chairs, and place “[FDG/DiGRA 2016 Workshop Submission]” in the subject line.

Deadlines workshops

Submission deadlines

  • November 16 2015 (hard deadline)

Acceptance/rejection notification

  • December 11 2015

Location & Date

  • August 1-6 2016
  • The School of Arts, Media and Computer Games, Abertay University
  • Dundee, Scotland, UK

For more information see: www.digra-fdg2016.org

Program Chairs

 

Video Game Policy: new book

Video Game Policy (book cover).
Video Game Policy.

Most recent book to come out in the Routledge Advances in Games Studies series that I have contributed into: Video Game Policy: Production, Distribution, and Consumption (edited by Steven Conway & Jennifer deWinter) is now available for pre-order. Here is the table of contents, including our co-authored chapter on re-conceptualizing what “video game violence” is, and means, with Gareth Schott:

Introduction – Steven Conway & Jennifer deWinter

Section I: Intellectual Property, Privacy, and Copyright

1.Laws of the Game: Intellectual Property in the Video Game Industry – Mark Methenitis

2.Digital Locks, Labor, and Play in Canada’s Copyright Policy: Filtering Power through Configurations of Game Development – Owen Livermore

3.The Princess Doesn’t Leave the Castle: How Nintendo’s WiiWare Imprisons Indie Game Design – Theo Plothe

4.Policies, Terms of Service, and Social Networking Games – Stephanie Vie

Section II: Rating Systems and Cultural Politics

5.E(SRB) Is for Everyone: Game Ratings and the Practice of Content Evaluation – Judd Ethan Ruggill and Ken S. McAllister

6. Games for Grown-Ups?: An Historical Account of the Australian Classification System – Steven Conway and Laura M. Crawford

7. Rockstar versus Australia – Mark Finn

8. Play Britannia: The Development of U.K. Video Game Policy – Ren Reynolds

Section III: Violence in Video Games

9. Re-conceptualizing Game Violence: Who Is Being Protected and from What? – Gareth Schott and Frans Mäyrä

10. Playing Around with Causes of Violent Crime: Violent Video Games as a Diversion from the Policy Challenges Involved in Understanding and Reducing Violent Crime – James D. Ivory and Adrienne Holz Ivory

11. Banning Violent Video Games in Switzerland: A Public Problem Going Unnoticed – Michael Perret

12. Toxic Gamer Culture, Corporate Regulation, and Standards of Behavior among Players of Online Games – Thorsten Busch, Kelly Boudreau, and Mia Consalvo

Section IV: Politics and Regulations

13.The Right to Play in the Digital Era – Tom Apperley

14. Against the Arcade: Video Gaming Regulation and the Legacy of Pinball – Carly A. Kocurek

15. Curt Schilling’s Gold Coins: Lessons for Creative Industry Policy in Light of the 38 Studios Collapse – Randy Nichols

16.The Ban on Gaming Consoles in China: Protecting National Culture, Morals, and Industry within an International Regulatory Framework – Bjarke Liboriussen, Andrew White, and Dan Wang

17. Regulating Rape: The Case of RapeLay, Domestic Markets, International Outrage, and Cultural Imperialism – Jennifer deWinter

Afterword – Ashley S. Lipson

The publisher’s web pages with ordering information can be found at: https://www.routledge.com/products/9781138812420.

The Video Game Debate, new book available for (pre)order

Video Game Debate (book cover)
The Video Game Debate.

New book available for preorder: The Video Game Debate: Unravelling the Physical, Social, and Psychological Effects of Video Games (eds. Rachel Kowert & Thorsten Quandt; publisher: Routledge). Table of contents for this highly interesting, multidisciplinary volume is below:

1. A Brief History of Video Games – James D. Ivory

2. The Rise (and Refinement) of Moral Panic – Nicholas D. Bowman

3. Are Electronic Games Health Hazards or Health Promoters? – Cheryl K. Olson

4. The Influence of Digital Games on Aggression and Violent Crime – Mark Coulson and Christopher J. Ferguson

5. Gaming Addiction and Internet Gaming Disorder – Mark D. Griffiths

6. Social outcomes: Online game play, social currency, and social ability – Rachel Kowert

7. Debating How to Learn From Video Games – John L. Sherry

8. Video Games and Cognitive Performance – Gillian Dale and C. Shawn Green

9. Exploring Gaming Communities – Frans Mäyrä

10. No black and white in video game land! Why we need to move beyond simple explanations in the video game debate – Thorsten Quandt and Rachel Kowert

The publisher’s pages for the book are at: http://www.tandf.net/books/details/9781138831636/

There is also an Amazon.com page for pre-ordering: http://www.amazon.com/The-Video-Game-Debate-Psychological/dp/1138831638 .

Also, the author’s version of my chapter that discusses the study of “gaming communities” is available from here: http://people.uta.fi/~frans.mayra/Gaming_Communities.pdf.

Finland in ‘Video Games Around the World’ book

Video Games Around the World (book).
Video Games Around the World

I got today in mail delivery my author’s copy of the very interesting book Video Games Around the World (The MIT Press). Edited by the encyclopaedicly knowledgeable and eminently productive Mark J.P. Wolf, it features 40 essays about games and game cultures in different parts of the world (all continents are discussed – even Antarctica gets a mention). With 656 pages this is a major, international collaborative event for global game studies, and I am happy to having been part of the project. Hopefully it will stimulate even more detailed, and also comparative, international studies in the future. I have also put online an early draft version (dated in April 2012) of my own chapter on Finnish games and game culture here: http://people.uta.fi/~frans.mayra/Mayra-Video_Games_in_Finland.pdf. More of the book from the MIT Press page at: http://mitpress.mit.edu/books/video-games-around-world.

And, if you are interested in games and game culture of Finland, I very much recommend the recent Finnish Video Games: A History and Catalog by Juho Kuorikoski, the most comprehensive work on the topic and probably the leading work on games of any single, small country from this perspective.

Games and Culture: new papers

Interesting new research has been published in Games and Culture journal, OnlineFirst:

Articles

Is it in the Game? Reconsidering Play Spaces, Game Definitions, Theming, and Sports Videogames

by Garry Crawford

Stand by Your Man

by Rabindra A. Ratan, Nicholas Taylor, Jameson Hogan, Tracy Kennedy, and Dmitri Williams

Predicting Video Game Behavior: An Investigation of the Relationship Between Personality and Mobile Game Play

by Soonhwa Seok and Boaventura DaCosta

CFP: DiGRA 2015

Call for papers: DiGRA 2015

Diversity of play: Games – Cultures – Identities
14-17 May 2015, Lüneburg, Germany
www.digra2015.org

Video game culture has had a self-image of being a distinct cultural form united by participants identifying themselves as ‘gamers’ for many years. Variations in this identity have been perceived either in relation to preferred platform or level of commitment and skill (newbie, casual, core, pro, etc.). Today the popularity of games has increased dramatically, games have become more specialized and gaming is taking place in a number of divergent practices, from e-sport to gamification. In addition, the gamer position includes a number of roles and identities such as: players, learners, time-fillers, users, fans, roleplayers, theory crafters, speed runners, etc. Furthermore, techniques like gamification and game-based learning, as well as the playful use of computer simulation for training purposes, is making it difficult to distinguish games from non-games.

Additionally, video game culture is merging with other forms of popular culture and new mobile technologies are making distinctions between digital and non-digital gaming blurred. Yet, whilst the forms of play seem to have become more diverse, the content of games is often only challenged by independent titles. This is the case despite a maturing audience, some of whom now seem to urge for more diverse themes and representations within games. In the light of increasing criticism of the representations and practices that have dominated much of games culture, it seems that the relationship between the identity of the ‘gamer’ and the content of games is undergoing a change.

Traditionally, game studies has tried to find common ground, seeking shared definitions and epistemologies. DiGRA 2015 seeks to encourage questions about the ‘Diversity of play’, with a focus on the multiple different forms, practices and identities labeled as games and/or game culture. The conference aims to address the challenge of studying and documenting games, gaming and gamers, in a time when these categories are becoming so general and/or contested, that they might risk losing all meaning. Given this, what concepts do we need to develop in order for our research to be cumulative and how do we give justice to the diverse forms of play found in different games and game cultures?

As in the previous year, DiGRA 2015 will accept submissions in five categories: full papers, abstracts, panel, workshops, and events. All submissions will be peer-reviewed using double blind reviewing. In addition, all submissions will receive a meta review and authors of rejected full papers will have the possibility to send a rebuttal if they perceive they have been given biased or uninformed reviewers. The conference welcomes submissions on a wide range of topics, including, but not limited to, the following:

  • Game cultures
  • Games and intersections with other cultural forms
  • Online gaming and communication in game worlds
  • Gender and gaming
  • Games as representation
  • Minority groups and gaming
  • Childhood and gaming
  • The gaming industry and independent games
  • Game journalism
  • Gaming in non-leisure settings
  • Applications of game studies in other domains
  • Gamification
  • System perspectives and mathematical game theory
  • Hybrid games and non-digital games
  • Game design characteristics
  • Technological systems
  • Simulations

Deadlines

  • Submission deadlines 22 January (hard deadline)
  • Acceptance/rejection notification 16 March
  • Rebuttal deadline 19 March
  • Camera ready deadline 14 April

Location & Date

14-17 May 2015

Lüneburg, Germany
At Campus of Leuphana University of Lüneburg
Scharnhorststr. 1
D-21335 Lüneburg
For more information and the latest updates regarding the DiGRA 2015 conference, see www.digra2015.org

Program Chairs
Staffan Björk
Jonas Linderoth

European Summer School in Games and Play Studies

Next two weeks will be intensive time in Utrecht, the Netherlands, as “Identity and Interdisciplinarity in Games and Play Research”, the joint European Summer School of games and play studies takes place at the Utrecht University. My keynote takes place first in Monday, August 18th, and it is titled “From Interdisciplinarity to Identity and Back: The Dual Character of Academic Game Studies”. More information and full program is available at: http://www.gapsummerschool2014.nl.