10-year-update: my home pages

screenshot-2016-12-26-16-23-27Update: the new design is now live at: www.unet.fi. – My current university side home pages are from year 2006, so there is a decade of Internet and WWW evolution looming over them. Static HTML is not so bad in itself – it is actually fast and reliable, as compared to some more flaky ways of doing things. However, people access online content increasingly with mobile devices and getting a more “responsive” design (that is, web page design code that scales and adapts content into small or large screen devices differently) is clearly in order.

When one builds institutional home pages as part of the university or other organisation infrastructure, there are usually various technical limitations or other issues, so also in this case. While I have a small “personnel card” style, official contact page in our staff directory, I have wanted my personal home pages to include more content that would reflect my personal interests, publication activity, and to carry links to various resources that I find important or relevant. Our IT admin, however, has limited the WWW server technologies to a pretty minimal set, and there is not, for example “mod_rewrite” module loaded to the Apache that serves our home pages. That means that my original idea to go with a “flat file CMS” to create the new pages (e.g. Kirby: https://getkirby.com/) did not work. There was only one CMS that worked without mod_rewrite that I could find (CMSimple: https://www.cmsimple.org/), and testing that was pain (it was too clumsy and limited in terms of design templates and editing functions for my, non-coder tastes). The other main alternative was to set up a CMS that relies on an actual database (MySQL or similar), but that was forbidden from personal home pages in our university, too.

For a while I toyed with an idea that I would actually set up a development server of my own, and use it to generate static code that I would then publish on the university server. Jekyll (https://jekyllrb.com/) was most promising option in that area. I did indeed spend few hours (after kids have gone to bed) in setting up a development environment into my Surface Pro 4, building on top of the Bash/Ubuntu subsystem, adding Python, Ruby, etc., but there was some SSH public key signing bug that broke the connection to GitHub, which is pretty essential for running Jekyll. Debugging that road proved to be too much for me – the “Windows Subsystem for Linux” is still pretty much a work-in-progress thing. Then I also tried to set up an Oracle VM VirtualBox with WordPress built in, but that produced some other, interesting problems of its own. (It just also might be a good idea to use something a bit more powerful than Surface Pro for running multiple server, photo editing and other tools at the same time – but for many things, this tablet is actually surprisingly good.)

Currently, the plan is that I will develop my new home pages in WordPress, using a commercial “Premium” theme that comes with actual tutorials on how to use and adapt it for my needs (plus they promise support, when I’ll inevitably lose my way). In last couple of days, I have made decent progress using the Microsoft Webmatric package, which includes an IIS server, and pretty fully featured WordPress that runs on top of that (see: http://ivanblagojevic.com/how-to-install-wordpress-on-windows-10-localhost/). I have installed the theme of my choice, and plugins it requires, and started the selection and conversion of content for the new framework. Microsoft, however, has decided to discontinue Webmatrix, and the current setup seems bit buggy, which makes actual content production somewhat frustrating. The server can suddenly lose reading rights to some key graphics file, for example. Or a WordPress page with long and complex code starts breaking down at some point, so that it fails to render correctly. For example, when I had reached about the half way point in creating the code and design for my publications page, the new text and graphics started appearing again from the top of the page, on top of the text that was there already!

I will probably end up setting up the home pages into another server, where I can actually get a full Apache, with mod_rewrite, MySQL and other necessary functions for implementing WordPress pages. In UTA home pages there would then be a redirect code that would show the way to the new pages. This is not optimal, since the search engines will not find my publications and content any more under the UTA.fi domain, but this is perhaps the simplest solution in getting the functionalities I want to actually run as they should. Alternatively, there are some ways to turn a WordPress site into static HTML pages, which can then be uploaded to the UTA servers. But I do not hold my breath whether all WordPress plugins and other more advanced features would work that way.

Happy Geek Holidays!

CFP: DiGRA 2017, Australia

Call for Participation DiGRA2017: The 10th Digital Games Research Association Conference

We are delighted to announce the Call for Participation for DiGRA 2017, to be held July 3-6 2017, at Swinburne University of Technology in Melbourne, Australia.

DiGRA 2017 will bring together a diverse international community of interdisciplinary researchers engaged in cutting edge research in the field of game studies. DiGRA 2017 is supported by Swinburne University of Technology, RMIT, The University of Sydney and The University of Melbourne. The conference welcomes submissions on a wide range of topics associated with studies of games and play.

For an expanded CFP see the conference website: www.digra2017.com.

Important Dates
– Submission date (workshops): 20 January 2017
– Acceptance/rejection notification (workshops): 27 January 2017
– Submission date (all submissions except workshops): 26 February 2017 (hard deadline)
– Acceptance/rejection notification (all submissions except workshops): 25 March 2017
– Camera ready: 15 April 2017 Conference dates: 3-6 July 2017

Submission Types
We welcome a range of contributions to DiGRA2017. These include, full papers, extended abstracts, panel and workshop proposals, doctorial consortium participation as well as proposals for events and other activities that fall outside the academic tradition.

Full papers will be peer-reviewed, published on the conference website and in the conference proceedings available on open-access through the DiGRA digital library.

All other submissions will be reviewed by the conference organization committee. These submissions will be published on the conference website, but will not be included in the conference proceedings published through the DiGRA library.

For an expanded CFP see the conference website: www.digra2017.com.

Suomen Pelimuseo, The Finnish Museum of Games

The Finnish Museum of Games (Suomen Pelimuseo) was open for the first time tonight; this event was only for the various partners who had made the museum possible, experts and makers, as well as to the important donators in the crowdfunding campaign. Pelimuseo is the first public organisation in Finland which has successfully run a crowdfunding effort to realise its goals: there were over 1100 people and organisations who took part (our UTA/SIS Game Research Lab was one).

This first look was exiting experience, and already convinced me that this museum will be a major success story. There is so much pent-up need for re-experiencing, reflecting and sharing of game culture, play histories and digital cultural heritage of the past decades that it is obvious this museum will have to face the positive problem of how to facilitate the requirements coming from its popularity. That is at least my feeling on the basis of this first evening, as a large crowd of game enthusiasts, parents with their kids, game designers, game scholars, game educators, historians, journalists, members of gaming subcultures of various kinds gathered together to celebrate and re-experience some of the formative elements from their personal pasts, as well as to meet for the first time some forgotten gems of digital, as well as analog (e.g. board game, rpg, larp) games of the past.

The Finnish Museum of Games will officially open its doors to audience in January 2017. It is located in Vapriikki museum centre, in Tampere. More at: https://suomenpelimuseo.fi/.

CFP: Spectating Play, 24-25 April 2017

Spectating Play – 13th Annual Game Research Lab Spring Seminar 24th-25th of April 2017, Tampere Finland

http://spectatingplay.com/call-for-papers/

Important dates

– Abstract Deadline: January 18th, 2017
– Notification of Acceptance: February 3rd, 2017
– Full Paper deadline: April 3rd, 2017
– Seminar dates: April 24-25, 2017

Call for Papers
This year’s Game Lab Spring Seminar focuses on the spectating elements of play. Below you will find detailed instructions regarding the CFP for this Spring Seminar.

Spectating play
Watching play unfold is almost as pervasive as play itself. Today, developments such as let’s plays, eSports, and streaming have made spectating play an important mode of engaging with digital games. Historically, sporting arenas have brought together not only skillful athletes, but huge crowds of spectators. The audience has an effect on the play, from the cheering of the fans of the home team, to rule changes implemented in sports in order to make them more television friendly. The spectator experience places different design considerations on a game than that of the player experience.

Digital games have always had spectators, be it in an arcade or a sibling waiting for their turn to play on the home console. However, during the last decade spectatorship has become much more visible, first through esports, and more recently through streaming. Numerous new genres of recorded play videos have emerged, from let’s plays to speedruns. Furthermore, the audiences of livestreamed games is hardly passive; amongst other things they comment, form communities, participate in playing, and financially support the players.

Simultaneously, in some play cultures the line between the audience and the player/performer is being blurred on purpose. From immersive theatre to larp and from reality television competitions to amateur livestreaming and onto phenomena such as the “Twitch plays Pokemon”, the structures around watching and playing are shifting.

Spectating Play is the 13th annual spring seminar organized by University of Tampere Game Research Lab. The seminar welcomes any and all scholarly work on the intersection of audiences and game/play.

The possible list of topics includes but is not limited to:

  • Streaming play
    • Live and recorded play
    • Genres: Let’s plays, speedruns, machinima, unboxing, reaction videos, etc.
    • Managing streamers and tubers
    • Production and business models of streaming
    • Cultures and practices of streaming
    • Boundary negotiation between work and play
  • Audience
    • Audience participation in games
    • Designing games for spectating
    • Audience theory for participant
    • Why spectate? Audience gratifications
    • Learning by watching (i.e. foreplayers, tutorials, walkthroughs)
    • Passive and ambient play
  • Performing for spectators
    • eSports
    • Performative game development (e.g. streaming, use of time-lapse videos and public game jams)
    • Arenas for play as performance
    • Arcade culture
  • Perspectives on spectated play
    • History of spectating play
    • The limits of recording as a document of play
    • How spectating play transforms into play practices

The seminar emphasises work-in-progress submissions, and we strongly encourage submitting late-breaking results, working papers, and submissions from graduate students. The purpose of the seminar is to have peer-to-peer discussions and thereby provide support in refining and improving research work in this area.

The papers to be presented will be chosen based on an extended abstract review. Full papers are distributed prior the event to all participants, in order to facilitate discussion. The seminar is looking into partnering with a journal so that the best papers would be invited to be further developed for publication in a special journal issue. In the past we have collaborated with Games and Culture, Simulation & Gaming, International Journal of Role-Playing, and ToDiGRA journals. The seminar will be chaired by Professor Frans Mäyrä (School of Information Sciences, University of Tampere) and Associate Professor Juho Hamari (UC Pori / Tampere University of Technology & University of Turku). There will also be two invited commentators, to be announced later.

The seminar will be held in Tampere, Finland and will be free of charge; the number of participants will be restricted.

Submission guidelines
The papers will be selected for presentation based on extended abstracts of 500-1000 words (plus references). Abstracts should be sent in the PDF format. Please use 12 pt Times New Roman, double-spaced, for your text. Full paper guidelines will be provided with the notification of acceptance.

Our aim is that all participants can familiarise themselves with the papers in advance. Therefore, the maximum length for a full paper is 5000 words (plus references). The seminar presentations should encourage discussion, instead of repeating the information presented in the papers. Every paper will be presented for 10 minutes and discussed for 20 minutes.

Submissions should be sent to: submissions@spectatingplay.com.

Lautapelikysely, Hybrid Social Play

Pelaatko tai pelaavatko perheenjäsenesi lautapelejä usein, satunnaisesti tai harvoin? Vastaa lautapeliaiheiseen kyselyyn!

Kysely on osa Turun, Tampereen ja Jyväskylän yliopiston yhteistä Hybrid Social Play -hanketta. Hankkeen tutkimuskohteena ovat erilaiset tuotteet kuten lautapelit, leikkivälineet ja raha-automaatit sekä niiden yhteydessä hyödynnetyt sähköiset ja digitaaliset ominaisuudet kuten älypuhelimet, tietokoneet ja sosiaalisen median palvelut.

Tutkimuksen kannalta on tärkeää, että saamme vastauksia erilaisilta lautapelaajilta. Vastaaminen ei edellytä aktiiviharrastusta. Voit valita, mihin kysymyksiin vastaat. Kyselyn yhteydessä järjestetään lautapeliarvonta 15.12.2016 mennessä vastanneiden ja yhteystietojensa jättäneiden kesken.

Kyselylomakkeeseen pääset alla olevasta linkistä. Täyttäminen vie arviolta 10-30 minuuttia riippuen kirjoitusinnostasi. Kyselylinkkiä saa jakaa eteenpäin. Kiitämme vastauksista!

https://www.webropolsurveys.com/S/DB26641B9FCA0CD6.par

Vaasa Game Days, Suomen pelitutkimuksen seuran syyskokous

Huomenna, 24.11. Vaasassa kokoontuu Suomen pelitutkimuksen seura ensimmäiseen syyskokoukseensa (ks. kokouskutsu alla ja Seuran verkkosivut). Vuosikokous kytkeytyy Vaasa Game Days-tapahtumaan, missä itse pidän luennon otsikolla “Pelitutkimuksesta pelillistyvän kulttuurin ja yhteiskunnan tutkimukseen”. Ohjelma: http://www.vaasagamedays.fi/pages/news_display.php?nid=57.

Kokouskutsu: Tervetuloa Suomen pelitutkimuksen seura ry:n syyskokoukseen.

Aika: torstai 24.11.2016 kello 10.00-12.00

Paikka: F223, Fabriikin 2. krs/Viestintätieteet, Vaasan yliopisto
Kokouksessa käsitellään sääntömääräiset asiat ja valitaan toiminnantarkastaja vuosille 2016 ja 2017.

Käsiteltävät asiat:

1. Kokouksen avaus

2. Valitaan kokouksen puheenjohtaja, sihteeri, kaksi pöytäkirjantarkastajaa ja ääntenlaskijaa

3. Todetaan kokouksen laillisuus ja päätösvaltaisuus

4. Hyväksytään kokouksen työjärjestys

5. Vahvistetaan toimintasuunnitelma, tulo- ja menoarvio sekä liittymis- ja jäsenmaksujen suuruudet vuodelle 2017

6. Valitaan hallituksen puheenjohtaja ja muut jäsenet vuodelle 2017

7. Valitaan yksi tai kaksi toiminnantarkastajaa ja varatoiminnantarkastajaa tai yksi tai kaksi tilintarkastajaa ja varatilintarkastajaa vuosille 2016 ja 2017

8. Muut asiat

9. Kokouksen päättäminen